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Big Up Podcast 78 ~ Ipman [pReconstrvct III]

Big Up Podcast 78 ~ Ipman [pReconstrvct III]

ipman

As Brooklyn is counting days down to Reconstrvct this Saturday, we have chatted with our most anticipated headliner of the night – Ipman and convinced him to record a mixtape of his current influences and beats he is feeling at the moment. The result is a sick mix of dark and heavy with quirky and melodic – in a true unpredictable style of Ipman. Listen up.

[toggle title=”Track List”]Milanese – One Eye
Bandshell – Nice Mullett
Killawatt – Backed Into a Fucked Up Recess
Amon Tobin – Dropped From the Sky (2562 Remix)
Cristian Vogel – Lucky Connor
Luke Abbot – Brazil
Emprom – Beasts of Babylon
Quasimoto – Closer feat. MF DOOM
E.M.M.A – Shoot the Curl
Ipman – I.P.A
aabcehmu – Alone With Everyone
Klaus Schulz – Melange
Ipman – Untitled[/toggle]

interview by Luke McCann

May I start with the obligatory, what is your real name and where ya from?

I’m Jack Gibbons and I come from a small place called Ross-on-Wye, out in the sticks, but now I live on the South coast of the UK in Southsea.

Tea or coffee? Spliff or not to spliff?

It used to be that I didn’t go for any tbh. But recently I have started drinking coffee. It’s actually pretty great, especially when you have to get in the zone and knock out an interview you were supposed to finish three days ago 😉 Me and spliff don’t get along much.

I can barely remember what I did 2 weeks ago but I do remember hearing “Flipmode” in the rental car via Lurka two winters ago after a Reconstrvct. The baselines, breaks, and rolls made that factory soundsystem rattle the whole car! Where did you learn to make music and what do you use to make it?

I’ve been learning about music since I was very young. My parents are both musicians and they got me on it early on. I consider myself quite lucky in that respect. A lot of the theory and workings behind music came quite naturally to me and I’m quite sure this is because I was exposed to a lot of stuff from an early age. From about 10 years old onwards I had more formal education, all the way up to uni where I studied music tech and really got stuck into that side of things. I’m currently on Ableton, sometimes I use Logic as well, it depends on the project.

Any studio rituals or essential elements needed for you to write music?

[quote_left] Most of the time I procrastinate massively and end up listening to the same 16 bars for three hours on end, eventually driving myself insane, so I have to stop and get out of the house. [/quote_left]Not really. If it’s on, then I’m happy to just jam for four hours. Most of the time though I procrastinate massively and end up listening to the same 16 bars for three hours on end, eventually driving myself insane, so I have to stop and get out of the house.

What’s the story behind the name “Ipman”, if any?

Um, not much of a story really. I just like how it sounded. I’m a bit of a martial arts nerd and that’s it really. Apologies to China for appropriation of the name… but you know… post-modernism or something.

They say everyone has a price, and not to be a dick, but how else do you earn money? I ask because many artists say they are glad they have a job or something else to ground them. What is your relationship with work and play?

Yeah, I was working for much of 2012 as a composer and sound designer for a studio, mainly working within the media marketing industry doing spots on TV adverts and trailers and stings and so on. It was ok, but I never really took to it. These jobs sound great on paper, but in reality it didn’t offer me any of the creative freedom that was promised. You just end up doing lots of lame soundalikes, and it made me generally miserable, so I quit. I’ve done a little bit of freelance stuff since, but at the moment I work at a microbrewery/pub, (they’re going to train me up as a brewer which is pretty awesome. I really like beer a lot) to keep my head above water, as the music is not really a feasible way to live at this moment. Much respect to those who have managed to find a way to make a living off of it though, it is not easy at all.

I remember delivering flowers when I was younger to really old people… scarred the shit out of me. As well as washing dishes in an Italian restaurant as a teen. What is the lamest or least favorite job you’ve ever had?

[quote_left] If it was a fire I’d be coughing and sneezing up black for a few days after… rubbish. [/quote_left]AHA. I used to work for a company that goes round to people’s houses after they had had a fire or a flood to clean them out of all the debris and shit. That was pretty depressing. If it was a fire I’d be coughing and sneezing up black for a few days after… rubbish.

It takes thick skin (humility), patience, and strong work ethic to do what you do. Care to discuss why you make music in the first place? What do you get from this? Did you grow up with electronic music/underground parties? Any memorable nights from years ago when you were just out for the music (not producing then)?

I dunno if it was ever a conscious choice for me. I’ve been going to my Dad’s concerts since before I can really remember (he plays viola in an orchestra). I’ve grown up with music and I don’t think I could distinguish a point where I decided to make it, I just always have done.

Fair enough. Forget genres, fans, nights, fb, twitter, comments, anything like that. Where would you like to take your music? Maybe describe an ideal gig or dream gig if money wasn’t an object.

[quote_left]Then I’d go undercover hermit style, until I’d perfected my modular orchestra masterpiece. [/quote_left]If money was no object, then first I would buy all the modular synths I could get my hands on, because there is no more fun way to make electronic music in my opinion. Then I’d go undercover hermit style, until I’d perfected my modular orchestra masterpiece. Just to reiterate, modular synthesis is awesome. I’d rather be able to play a live set than DJ tbh, but the amount of money it takes is just unfeasible right now. If it was a gig, I probably would just get in all the DJs I would like to see: I can hear me DJ whenever I want for free.

One thing I really like about your style is it’s totally unpredictable. But if there’s another simple way to tell a newcomer about your music/DJ set, what would it be?

[quote_left]Unpredictable is good. I hate making the same thing twice. [/quote_left]Nah, unpredictable is good. I hate making the same thing twice. Now I know that a lot of producers probably think that, but for me it means every time I start a tune it’s all new sounds and usually all new approach. I don’t get it when every new track by X producer just sounds like all their other ones. I get bored really easily, so I have to keep myself interested by constantly experimenting, playing around, finding new techniques, trying out new styles etc.

rec

I always tell artists at Reconstrvct, now is the time to play ANYTHING you’ve ever wanted. Don’t hold back, because I know there is something lurking under the perceived/expected style of every artist. So, what can we expect from your 90 min set at Reconstrvct XVI?

I honestly haven’t decided much yet. I’ll start to panic next week and get everything ready then probably. Recently I’ve been moving up through tempos, from 130 into 140, which has worked nicely. May go faster. It really depends on the crowd… I like to try things out, and if they work I’ll go with that. And if not, then I’ll slap on some classics I guess… Generally I like to mix it up, there’ll be some dubstep, some techno, some garage, some jungle, some grime, etc.

Word. Requests from no-littles are the worst, but I really would love to hear “Flipmode” on our soundsystem! What is the worst thing someone has said to you about your? Best?

Can’t remember. I don’t think I’ve had anyone saying anything that bad, because I probably would remember that.

Anything in particular you want to get off your chest or advice to give about doing your own thing musically?

[quote_left]You will have more fun and more success if you make something that is truly yours and not just a carbon copy of whatever was someone else’s 12 months ago and everyone decided to rip off. [/quote_left]Just to reiterate what every other interviewee says ever: You will have more fun and more success if you make something that is truly yours and not just a carbon copy of whatever was someone else’s 12 months ago and everyone decided to rip off. Also don’t be in a rush to release it. Work on your music until it’s as good as it can be, and then find a label who you believe can support it fully and genuinely.

Do you know what TLDR means? Too Long Didn’t Read. And I feel there’s so much music today that we can’t listen to it all. Technology is expanding at a break-neck speed. A nobel prize winner said “that information consumes the attention of its recipients, hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention.” Do you ever feel inundated with information? Music? How do you see this trend evolving?

Yeah it’s probably true, it’s never been easier to make music and distribute it, so it can also be easier to feel inundated. But then there’s always been a large amount of rubbish music clamouring for attention, we’ve just forgotten about it. I think that, as ever, it’s the unfortunate reality, that whoever has enough money/resources/network to use towards press and marketing and building up hype is going to be more successful. So the amount of music out there isn’t really going to be an issue if most people still rely on a couple of different aggregators to feed them the new stuff. This is true of both the mainstream and the underground.

Thanks for the wise words, man! See you this Saturday in Brooklyn!

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