Big Up Mix 83 ~ Dr. Res

Dr.Res_blog

[dropcap color=”666666″]T[/dropcap]he mastery, craftsmanship and care in Dr. Res's production is evident in every aspect of the work he puts out into the world. His latest release Lung Kidnapping, via Spanish finest Disboot label, shows that taking time, personal approach, organic collaborations and authentic field recordings go a very long way and result in highest visual and audial quality of the final creation. It's a similar approach that Dr. Res took with this mix we present to you today with pride. We hope it will make your journey wherever you are going a lot more special.

We asked Barcelona native David Torres (Dr. Res) about his life in Poblenou, his strange lung anomaly, what he smokes in the studio, and where he records his found sounds..


interview by Katya Guseva

What can you tell us about the mix you made for us?

I have devoted a lot of time to this podcast. I usually don’t record mixes, as I find it difficult to select the music for a determined time frame. I always have this feeling of having left out something very important and that’s why I never prepare my sessions when I play out. I just go loaded with lots of music and simply improvise.

In the first selection I had chosen 70 tracks, impossible to put into an hour, so I went through trying and discarding until I was left with 21 tracks that are in the final mix. There are distinct styles, tempos and sounds that made it hard to choose the order, but in the end I am happy with the result.

My initial idea was to make a mix of purely dance music, but the truth is that I personally never listen to entire mixes that are like listening to a session in a club (although there are exceptions) but the majority don’t interest me, in fact they bore me. So I decided to do something a little bit different, even with quite a lot of rhythm and some dance tracks, I have structured it in a story-telling way, trying to maintain the listener’s attention and expectant of what comes after every track, I hope I have succeeded.

[toggle title=”Track List”]01. Wesphere – Cosmic G[rh]oddess [Cauto Remix] (Forthcoming ENSMBLE)
02. Niño – Plenilunio en Junio (Unreleased)
03. Fatima Al Qadiri – Hainan Island (Hyperdub)
04. Evian Christ – MYD (Tri Angle Records)
05. Dimito – Entierro (Dubkraft)
06. Dr. Res – Slow Exhale feat. SendiKa (Lapsus Records)
07. Fluxion – For You (Echocord)
08. LCC – Calx (Editions Mego)
09. Alex Smoke – LSD (R&S)
10. Akkord – Continuum (Forthcoming Houndstooth)
11. Christophe – Gotta Release [Last Magpie Remix] (Hypercolour)
12. Tessela – Hackney Parrot (Poly Kicks)
13. Jervis – Unknown
14. Guerre – Deatheat (Yes Please)
15. Dj Tennis – Anatomy (Life and Death)
16. Alex Banks – All You Could Do feat. Elizabeth Bernholz [Phon.o Remix] (Monkeytown Records)
17. Stray – Fragile (Exit Records)
18. Jody Breeze – The Way I Move (Ghettophiles)
19. Keiska – Tearjerk (B.YRSLF DIVISION)
20. Mark Pritchard – Ghosts (Warp Records)
21. Different Sleep – Be My Center (Svengali Label)[/toggle]

You cite Poblenou as your source of inspiration. Could you describe the district a bit for those who have never been, and how it affected you?

Poblenou is a post industrial neighborhood in Barcelona, which lives in constant transformation as a result of the determination of certain institutions in making it into, without success, the cradle of new technologies, even to the detriment of the effervescent artistic activity that has been in force in the neighborhood since many years ago. This has provoked a contrast if not even more interesting, for if you observe Poblenou from the outskirts you can appreciate a skyline worthy of the decor for a futuristic film, but if you enter into its streets you will see that these architectural experiments coexist with vacant land, abandoned (or not) warehouses, graffiti and areas inhabited by families that have been there for generations. In turn, each time more and more artists, designers, or simply people tired of the mass tourism that invades the more central areas of the city, have moved their base of operations or dwellings to Poblenou, thus helping to repopulate artistically the neighborhood to its true essence.

On a personal level, Poblenou has been a huge influence and formed a very important role to my development as a musician for various reasons. I had been working in Niu for four years until my recent move three months ago to Melbourne. Niu is a multidisciplinary artistic space that organizes exhibitions, workshops, concerts, live electronic music shows and attracts people from all walks of life. I have had the privilege to see, hear and know a lot of artists from many different disciplines, from all over the world, many of whom over time have become great friends and collaborators.

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It was during this time, during my first experiences dancing for days in warehouses, that I really started to enjoy and understand the world of electronic music.

[/quote_left]I think Poblenou first became really important to me about ten years ago – even before I started making music – a time when one still felt free in Barcelona and where you could find several raves simultaneously in one weekend. It was during this time, during my first experiences dancing for days in warehouses, that I really started to enjoy and understand the world of electronic music. Another reason why Poblenou is a key part of my music is the fact that two years ago I moved my studio to the heart of the neighborhood, where I was producing in a space of 2m2 within an old industrial warehouse alongside other artists, but which formerly was surely a space full of workers making noise with old machinery. This without a doubt has influenced my sound in one way or another.

Now that you live in Melbourne, do you feel like your sound is changing?

I moved to Melbourne three months ago, yet practically half the time since my arrival I have spent in a van on a road trip down the east coast, visiting incredible places, lost corners and discovering the immensity of Australia, or better phrased, a small part of it. I have had little time to sit and make music, but with the few ideas that I have started, I have definitely been able to appreciate certain differences in my music; less layers, less complicated structures, more optimistic melodies and a more minimal and clean sound. Also, having been surrounded by nature for a long unbroken time, the field recordings that I have made and am now incorporating are distinct and more organic.

Speaking of field recordings, how often do you deploy them in your production? Any memorable stories from sampling?

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.. Spending hours and hours in front of the screen [is] one of the reasons why sometimes electronic music can be excessively cold, when the interaction is reduced to the musician and his computer and machines and not with other people or the surrounding environment.

[/quote_left]Field recordings were an essential part of the creative process of Lung Kidnapping and will certainly be in everything that is to come. They are the departing point in the beginning of a new track, a very useful tool in achieving a more organic and personal sound. These last few years, having the studio inside of a warehouse, the possibilities of sampling things have been unlimited, but obviously the majority of theses sounds have been very mechanic and industrial sounding as is quite noticeable on the EP. Now, in Australia, I will need to find new sources of sounds, something that really excites me, as it helps to break the monotony that transpires when making electronic music – spending hours and hours in front of the screen – one of the reasons why sometimes electronic music can be excessively cold, when the interaction is reduced to the musician and his computer and machines and not with other people or the surrounding environment.

I don’t recall a story in particular, but perhaps the most recent and strange situation was when I was traveling in Australia, in the midst of an apocalyptic hail storm, my partner who was doing her best to hold up the windscreen from breaking, finds me recording the storm with a huge smile on my face imagining how good this sample would work out for a new techno track.

lung kidnapping

The cover artwork for Lung Kidnapping is stunning, as well as the teaser videos for your projects. How did you collaborate with the visual artist on this?

I am extremely pleased and grateful to have worked with Mau Morgó, considering that the visual concept and all that surrounds Lung Kidnapping was equally as important as the music itself, and that throughout the process they have been mutually feeding off one another.

Actually, the entire image was being created at the same time as the music. From the first tracks that I sent Mau to try and convince him to work with me, only two made it into the final EP. So I continued creating the other tracks for the EP, while he continued the artwork and throughout months we were like this, constantly exchanging audio and image files.

What was most interesting about the process was how well the context in which the music was being created was interpreted, from the initial idea, to how the music instantly inspired him to translate the sounds so quickly into videos, photos and visuals in general. I think that the idea was very inspiring for both of us, being from a real concept, carnal, not just about words chosen at random to get a good sound, and also because Lung Kidnappping is the name of a strange anomaly that I was born with, consisting of a malformation in the lung, which was removed five months ago, just after finalizing the release.

I see you have an A/V show for your performances, how important is the visual part in your sets?

Whenever I play a live show I always need a visual component to accompany me, as I think it creates an even more cinematic quality with my music. I’ve worked with visual artists such as Rukula or Pixel in Fact, with whom I’ve obtained very good results. But in my last live show, where I launched my EP, just before leaving Barcelona, I performed with Mau Morgó. It was perfect, as he had been by my side throughout the creative process, so the chemistry was ideal. This coupled with an industrial warehouse space in Poblenou, in the dark, with a big screen and thunderous sound, immortalized the date as one of the most important moments in my life. Mau created a visual landscape for each track, guiding the public on a journey throughout the concert. Some of those images are now videoclips.

Right now, living in the other side of the planet, I will have to rethink the visual part of my show.

What’s the ritual in the studio before you get started? Tea? Smokes? Snacks?

I used to smoke a lot, and every time I progressed in a song, I would sit back in my chair, turn up the volume and listen while smoking a cigarette. When I was making music with C156 it was like being in a club.

Over the past year I have been working on a new project with Manintheattic, where the creative process is more like a jam session while taste testing craft beers.

Nowadays it’s definitely a lot different and much healthier as I gave up smoking five months ago and instead of that cigarette I now prepare a cup of tea to sip on whilst I listen to the previous days’ work.

What’s your day job? Do you ever think of making music full time?

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Not having a university degree, I've had to learn everything I know, working for myself or for others, enduring shit jobs, but always seeming to learn something and taking the good from the bad.

[/quote_left]Right now I don’t have a stable job, and am currently looking for work in Melbourne to help me out with the cost of living in such an expensive city. Even though I’m still involved in a few freelance projects in Spain related to music, such as creating music for advertising etc, it’s not really enough. My ideal situation would be to be able to work in an artistic space like Niu, where I always had a smile on my face and enjoyed every minute.

Not having a university degree, I´ve had to learn everything I know, working for myself or for others, enduring shit jobs, but always seeming to learn something and taking the good from the bad. I suppose like anyone with a passion for music, my biggest dream would be to be able to dedicate all my time to music, to be able to live and survive from it, not only creating but also organizing events and parties, producing other artists and whatever else is related to the art in general.

Do you have any other secret talents besides music?

I’m not quite sure that I’m a music talent, so thank you for the compliment. The word talent is a big word, and I believe only a few people are truly talented musicians. If we are talking about things that I do well, perhaps I could say that I’m good, although an amateur, in the kitchen, snapping photos and, according to my friends, I’m a pretty good story teller, some even say I should take up writing.

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The injustice of the music industry often frustrates and angers me, as there are a lot of people, with true talent who aren't able to even play outside their hometowns and realistically are only being heard by very few listeners, whilst nearly daily we are being inundated with utter rubbish on the radio, TV etc ..

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Who are your favorite producers that we haven’t heard about yet (any underrated sound masters?)

I could write a never-ending list of high quality Spanish artists, as right now we’re living in a golden age of electronic music in all facets. However, it’s very sad to see that only a few lucky artists get to make themselves known. The injustice of the music industry often frustrates and angers me, as there are a lot of people, with true talent who aren’t able to even play outside their hometowns and realistically are only being heard by very few listeners, whilst nearly daily we are being inundated with utter rubbish on the radio, TV etc…

Some of my favorite local artists are: Cauto, Niño, Headbirds, Dimito and LCC, who all appear in the podcast. Also Sunny Graves, Uxuka, Ilia Mayer, Wooky, Mans o, Wesphere, Pina, Downliners Sekt, Reykjavik_606, Pyrénées, Arbol, Arenas, Lost Twin, Pauk, Mario Nieto, Drömnu, Xtrngr, Evan If, Manintheattic, Logical Disorder, Lenticular Clouds, Sau Poler, Orphidal, Skygaze, ¥ DVST, Playmodes, just to name a few.

Wow, that’s a list to get lost in! Who is your top critic? The one you’re nervous about sending your music to?

Whenever I am just about to finish something I always follow the same process. I show my partner first – she is very sincere and direct – and if there’s something she doesn’t like, she has no problem telling me. After I will send it to Cauto, Headbirds, The Gardener and Uxuka, who give me their honest opinions and in 100% of cases I make changes according to what they say. Im never truly convinced of the result, which is something that has brought me problems and why sometimes I can take an eternity to finish my tracks.

Tell us about your current exciting projects.

I have various projects on the go at the moment. I am currently working on some new tracks of my own, in preparation for another EP to be released at the beginning of 2015 with Disboot. I am also about to finish an EP with Manintheattic, which without ceasing to be electronic music is an attempt in structuring the tracks to be more like songs. There are wind instruments, percussions and whilst we have dedicated many months to its production we are very happy with the outcome. Once we’re finished we will be looking for a label to publish it.

Also, after collaborating on a track with SendiKa, which saw the light on the compilation that Lapsus Records put together for their tenth anniversary, and seeing the great response, we have decided to continue working together, which I am very excited about and already have several ideas in motion. But the most important thing right now is to look for gigs in Australia as it’s not easy starting from scratch in a country where no one knows you artistically. So if there’s something I need more than anything, it is to play over here as much as I can.


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